Protect Your USB Flash Drive Data - Windows 7

USB flash drives are convenient, portable, and very easy to lose. Which is a problem, especially if they're carrying sensitive data. New in Windows 7 is the ability to encrypt your documents with an extension of Microsoft's BitLocker technology, and only someone with the password will be able to access it. Right-click your USB flash drive, select Turn on BitLocker. Tick 'Use a password to unlock the drive' and type your password in. Now your data on your USB drive is safe and secure.

Repair Your Windows 7 Start Up Problem

The 'Startup Repair Tool' repairs Windows 7 by replacing important operating system files that might be damaged or missing. Startup Repair is an easy diagnostic and repair tool to use when Windows 7 fails to start properly.

Startup Repair can prevent a time-consuming reinstallation by diagnosing and repairing problems that prevent Windows from starting. The repair environment is now normally installed on your hard drive and is designed to start automatically if Windows detects a startup problem. If the repair tool doesn't start automatically press [F8] as your PC starts, and when you see a "Repair Your Computer" option, choose that to see the full range of Windows 7 recovery tools. Try System Restore first, this option solves many problems, if that fails then try Startup Repair. If the computer still won't boot, as a last resort, you can use 'System Image Recovery' provided you have a saved 'System Image'.

If for some reason your Windows 7 computer does not have the repair environment installed, you can boot from the Windows 7 DVD and go through the same process as above. (Watch for a Press any key to boot from CD or DVD message). Every modern Windows operating system has a similar file repair process, slightly different for each operating system.

Win 7 Reccovery Options

What is a system image?

The 'Startup Repair Tool' repairs Windows 7 by replacing important operating system files that might be damaged or missing. Startup Repair is an easy diagnostic and repair tool to use when Windows 7 fails to start properly.

 A system image is an exact copy of a drive. By default, a system image includes the drives required for Windows to run. It also includes Windows and your system settings, programs, and files. You can use a system image to restore the contents of your computer if your hard disk or computer ever stops working. When you restore your computer from a system image, it's a complete restoration—you can't choose individual items to restore, and all of your current programs, system settings, and files are replaced with the contents of the system image.

Although this type of backup includes your personal files, we recommend that you back up your files regularly using Windows Backup so that you can restore individual files and folders as needed. When you set up Windows Backup, you can let Windows choose what to back up, which will include a system image, or you can select the items that you want to back up and whether you want to include a system image.

Back up your programs, system settings, and files.

You can create a system image, which contains a copy of Windows and copies of your programs, system settings, and files. The system image is then stored in a separate location from the original programs, settings, and files. You can use this image to restore the contents of your computer if your hard disk or entire computer ever stops working.

If you're using Windows Backup to back up your files, you can have a system image created each time your files are backed up. The files can be saved on a USB flash drive, CDs, DVDs, or a hard drive. By default, the system image only includes the drives required for Windows to run. Follow the steps below to manually create a system image.

If you save the system image on an internal hard drive or an external (usb) hard drive, it must be formatted to use the NTFS file system.

To back up your programs, system settings, and files:

  1. Open Backup and Restore by clicking the Start button , clicking Control Panel, clicking System and Maintenance, and then clicking Backup and Restore.
  2. In the left pane, click Create a system image, and then follow the steps in the wizard. If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.